Many other prominent scientists of the 16th and 17th centuries, while perhaps not as overtly Christian as those listed in this section, were at least intellectually committed to the Scriptures and to Christ, as well as to a belief in special creation. Even though Galileo (1564–1642), for example, was officially censured for his heliocentric teachings by the Church, he himself believed the Bible and that it supported his views. Robert Hooke (1635–1703), brilliant physicist and geologist, William Harvey (1578–1657), who discovered the circulation of the blood, Christian Huygens (1629–1695), Tycho Brahe (1545–1601), Nicholas Copernicus (1473–1543) are further examples of the numerous scientists of this period who were at least theistic creationists.

Excerpted from: Men of Science Men of God, Henry M. Morris, pp. 21, 22

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