Textbook:

Life in the Great Ice Age

Life in the Great Ice Age

by Michael and Beverly Oard

Introduction:

These lessons are geared for younger students. Many lessons will, however, have activities for the older student. Parents/teachers will easily find answers to questions in the text, and should prepare themselves by reading the stated pages prior to having the student read the weekly assignment. If a child is not able to read yet, this is still a good book, and parents/teachers may read to the student. We have testimonies from parents of children as young as four years old who have enjoyed listening to the story in this book. There is truth to be learned from this story and that is the purpose of these lessons.

Further, we realize that while we suggest a certain number of pages for each lesson, children may want to hear the entire story and not wait for the six weeks it will take to get through the first set of lessons. It is okay to read the entire story to the children (Chapters 1–5). Rereading those pages as you and your children work through the lessons will only reinforce the truths contained in the book.

Read:

Pages 40–49 (Chapter 5)

Questions to answer:

  1. Have student retell Ungar’s account of what life was like “far away.”
  2. What is another name for the large, warm, salty “lake” in this chapter?
  3. What did Grandfather think was causing the ice wall to melt?
  4. Thought question: How do we know that the Beetle Brows were heading south when they left the camp?

Words to know:

  • turmoil
  • lowland

Activities:

  • Locate the Sahara desert, the Dead Sea, and Siberia on a world map.
  • Write a research paper on Siberia. What is the weather like now? How do people who live there survive? What animals inhabit that land today?
  • On a map, have students follow the route the elk, deer and other animals followed after they left Siberia.

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