A year and a half ago, many evolutionists harshly criticized AiG’s comments printed in the New York Times and Washington Post that there was a link between evolutionary teaching and school violence. (Even nationally syndicated columnist Mona Charan took a jab at AiG in her column.) With a school bombing being averted in California this week, a connection between evolutionary beliefs and school violence was once again on display.

De Anza College student Al Joseph DeGuzman’s plot to place bombs on his campus was exposed by a concerned photo processor at a drug store. The photo developer told the San Jose Mercury News (February 1) that “she felt scared the moment she saw the first photo from DeGuzman’s roll of film. The picture showed a crumpled shirt bearing the survivalist slogan, ‘Natural Selection’, lying with other clothes on Molotov cocktails.” (She alerted police, and the killing rampage that was to take place that day was thwarted.) The same newspaper also revealed that on DeGuzman’s personal Web site, he displayed his natural selection-influenced philosophy in the form of the slogan: “Purification in the form of carnage.”

While Answers in Genesis has never said that Darwinian thinking actually causes violent acts like school bombings and shootings (e.g. at Columbine High School in Colorado two years ago), as has been falsely charged, there is nevertheless a tie. As we explained to the Times and Post, when generations and generations of students are told that they are just the products of “survival of the fittest” over millions of years—with no meaning or purpose in life—should we be surprised that there is a sense of hopelessness and purposelessness among students? And because they have no moral basis in their lives, wouldn’t this foster an attitude among young people that they are therefore free to carry out their own Darwinian-justified “do your own thing” actions?

For the real reason why horrible things like school violence occur (and the remedy), read How to Build a “Bomb” in the United States Public School System (Cartoon) and Ken Ham’s Web commentary on the issue.

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