Although mega-bestselling1 author Tim LaHaye’s recent novel, “The Mind Siege Project,” does not feature Biblical apologetics as a major theme, its frequent references to both the absolute authority/standards of the Bible and the false worldview of evolution merit the attention of a Bible- and creation-defending ministry like AiG. Co-authored by Bob DeMoss, “The Mind Siege Project” may have been primarily intended as a teen novel (there is an accompanying non-fiction book entitled “Mind Siege’), but its Biblical lessons, twist in plot and intense drama should prove interesting reading for most adults as well.

While it is a work of fiction, “The Mind Siege Project” is relevant for exposing today’s hypocrisy and hubris of those who sanctimoniously claim on one hand that they are tolerant of all viewpoints, but see their veneer of tolerance dissolve when asked to permit any hint of Christianity in public life (e.g., prayer in public schools, teachers having academic freedom to share the problems with evolution with students, and so on—see, for example, Science Teacher Awaits Appeal on the Teaching of Evolution in his Class.) As Ken Ham of AiG declared in similar fashion in his acclaimed 1987 film “The Genesis Solution,” so-called “toleration” groups (such as the one in Ken’s native Australia) have been known to produce—in blatant contradiction of their philosophy—lists of beliefs they are AGAINST! So much for tolerance (and logic).

In “The Mind Siege Project,” eight teens on a boat are given lessons in “tolerance” and “diversity” by an instructor who, later in the voyage for example, won’t tolerate one of the students reading her Bible in front of the others. The teacher pronounces that a tolerance of all beliefs means a recognition that there is no absolute truth—that people can determine what is right or wrong for themselves, yet be careful not to impose their beliefs on others. This major humanistic tenet is put to the test when a character is close to losing her life, creating a quandary for the students seeking the right moral course of action to save her.

In a succinct passage that exposes secular humanism as morally ineffectual and illegitimate (i.e. based on a faulty view of the history of the world), the authors write:

“All week long Jodi had been told that concepts of right and wrong were outdated. According to Mrs. Meyer’s [leader of the diversity/tolerance lessons] view of the world, Jodi would be under no obligation to save the life of another. It’s survival of the fittest, right? Every man for himself. Just mind your own business and do what works for you—that’s your truth.”

In another passage, LaHaye, one of the founders of the creationist “think tank” of ICR thirty years ago, writes that “if it’s true that we’re just an accident, a product of evolution…survival of the fittest…you don’t have a moral duty [to save a person from death].” Without being “preachy,” the novel cites such (paraphrased) verses as “Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends” to inform readers that there are indeed absolutes in this world, and they are found in the inerrant and authoritative Word of God.

“The Mind Siege Project” is more than a popular work of fiction. It also shares the Gospel, declares that Christianity presents viable absolute standards today and serves as a parable for our Western society. LaHaye—recently named as the most influential evangelical leader of the past 25 years by “The Evangelical Studies Bulletin”—continues to be a major voice in proclaiming Biblical authority, regardless of how some Christians take his sometimes controversial views on eschatology, Christian psychology and politics.

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Footnotes

  1. Especially the hugely popular “Left Behind” prophecy novels. These nine novels have already sold about 33 million copies. Back