Textbook:

The Geology Book

The Geology Book

by Dr. John D. Morris

Whether jutting skyward, or languishing in the murky depths of the deep, rocks and sediments hold our little planet together. Dr John Morris takes the reader on a tour of the Earth’s crust, pointing out both the natural beauty and the scientific evidences for creation. Well illustrated, this book presents an accurate view of Earth’s natural history.

Introduction

These lessons are geared for middle-school students. Each lesson contains a series of questions to answer that pertain to the reading assignment. There is a section of each lesson for advanced students. Teachers should start with the Scripture lesson.

It is important that teachers prepare themselves by reading the stated pages prior to having the student read the assignment. If a child is not able to read yet, parents may wish to read the text to the student.

Text

  • Pages 58–68

Scripture

  • Genesis 1–11
  • Romans 6:23

Questions

  1. What four events have had the greatest impact in shaping earth’s geology?
  2. How did the Creation event affect the earth’s geology?
  3. Although the book states, “It may not have rained then as it does now, but a heavy dew watered the plants”, and discusses a “dense cloud of water vapor,” see the section on “canopy theory” at Get Answers: Arguments We Don’t Use for more information.
  4. Although the book indicates that the Second Law of Thermodynamics began at the Fall, consider this:
    The Second Law of Thermodynamics says that the entropy (disorder) of the Universe increases over time, and some have thought that this was the result of the Curse. However, disorder isn’t always harmful. An obvious example is digestion, breaking down large complex food molecules into their simple building blocks. Another is friction, which turns ordered mechanical energy into disordered heat—otherwise Adam and Eve would have slipped as they walked with God in Eden! A less obvious example to laymen might be the sun heating the Earth—to a physical chemist, heat transfer from a hot object to a cold one is the classic case of the Second Law in action. Also, breathing is based on another classic Second Law process, gas moving from a high pressure to low pressure. Finally, all beneficial processes in the world, including the development from embryo to adult, increase the overall disorder of the universe, showing that the Second Law is not inherently a curse.
    Death and suffering of nephesh animals before sin are contrary to the biblical framework above, as are suffering (or “groaning in travail” (Romans 8:20–22)). It is more likely that God withdrew some of His sustaining power (Colossians 1:15–17) at the Fall so that the decay effect of the Second Law was no longer countered.
  5. What role has the Fall played in shaping today’s Earth? (see also Get Answers: Death and Suffering)
  6. What was the cause of the global Flood? What were the geological results of the Flood?
  7. Why do we find ocean fossils near the top of Mt. Everest?
  8. What caused the Ice Age? (See also Get Answers: Ice Age)
  9. On a map, outline the extent of the ice covering at the peak of the Ice Age.
  10. What happened to the mammoths? (See Get Answers: Mammoths)

Terms

  • Second law of science
  • Fountains of the deep
  • Glacier

Note

Answers in Genesis has developed a curriculum called The Seven C’s of History. These lessons will help you teach your child not just about the topics of this lesson, but continue through history until Christ returns. To access the mini-curriculum visit this page.

Additional resources (for the more advanced student)

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