"As old as the hills [although, not millions of years old], and twice as dusty," the saying goes (about something that has become trite after a time).

That's the sentiment this author had in watching yet another evolutionist mock a belief in a literal creation by likening it to believing in a "flat earth." Most recently, that was the comment made about AiG (and other creationist organizations) by Dr. Alan Wolfe of Boston College, as he and Answers in Genesis were featured on America's NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams last month (March 25). Dr. Wolfe declared to the TV audience: "To teach kids that creationism explains something about the world is no different than teaching them that the earth is flat."

AiG has discovered that over the years, evolutionists have found it easier to resort to such scoffing (and ad hominem arguments) rather than to use rational, scientific arguments against those who reject evolution and accept a literal Genesis. Dr. Wolfe, director of the Boisi Center for Religion and American Life at Boston College in Massachusetts, USA, is just another in a long line of anti-creationists who resort to pulling out this hackneyed flat-earth analogy. Dr. Wolfe was essentially telling several million viewers that if creation is to be allowed in public schools, then the flat-earth theory should as well. (Even such a brilliant mind as the late Dr. Stephen J. Gould, used this terrible "apples and oranges" comparison.1)

This kind of bizarre analogy, occurring amidst a growing serious debate about the teaching of origins in science classes (schools in about twenty states are dealing with the issue), is unfortunate. Such a silly, cavalier attitude about the burgeoning pro-creation, anti-evolution movement may backfire in the long run, as the public tire of seeing highly credentialed evolutionists make nonsensical arguments like the hackneyed flat earth analogy to creation. If anything, it helps further reveal the bankruptcy of this worldview when they resort to such flimsy arguments. How?

You see, the theory of "molecules-to-man" evolution is outside observational science, but the shape of our earth is not. Even a layperson today can observe that the earth is not flat:

  1. The earth's roundness can be seen as a shadow on the moon during a lunar eclipse.
  2. We've all seen photos of a spherical earth taken by spacecraft circling the earth.
  3. Even people in ancient times saw ships disappear over the horizon, and knew (centuries before Columbus) that the earth was round.

In addition, Isaiah 40:22 (that book was written many centuries before the time of Christ) talks about the sphericity of the earth.

Another occasional accusation made by evolutionists against creationists is that some Christians and creation groups actually teach that the earth is flat.2 That's a red herring, for we don't know of any creationist group that believes in a flat earth. At the same time, we can't resist mentioning that there would certainly be evolutionists who accept false beliefs like astrology. However, it should be obvious that the validity of creation (or evolution) isn't affected by the fact that some of the adherents of either hold erroneous views on other subjects. Furthermore, we don't know of any credentialed scientist who holds to a flat-earth view.

We can only hope that scoffers like Dr. Wolfe-with their tidy sound bites-will have the opportunity to study the Bible for themselves and see that science, properly interpreted, does not contradict God's Word in any way. (It is unfortunate, however, that one of Dr. Wolfe's recent exposures to Christianity was his January visit to the campus of Calvin College in Michigan to give a lecture; while ostensibly a Christian school, Calvin has several evolutionists on its science and Bible faculties.) Such a cavalier, mocking attitude about the authority of the Bible has eternal consequences for those who reject the Bible as God's Word and its message of salvation through the Creator and Redeemer, Jesus Christ.

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Footnotes

  1. AiG Prominently Featured on CNN! Back
  2. Who Invented the Flat Earth? Some skeptics may point to the verse in Revelation 7:1 that refers to the “four corners of the earth” and hence a flat earth. But that is an obvious idiom, still used today, meaning “everywhere on the earth” or “from all directions.” See Are (Biblical) Creationists “Cornered?” Back