The Creation Museum of Answers in Genesis continues to draw international media coverage 11 months past its well-publicized opening on May 28, 2007. On balance, the media that have reported on the “walk through history” museum have been fair—with some exceptions of course: often-mocking British reporters are a prime example, and there are the occasional mocking columnists in North America. With the latter, we point out a recent piece by a regular columnist for the nationwide newspaper of Canada The National Post. The writer was unusually harsh—and highly misinformed—as he wrote about the Creation Museum. (Read his original column, see Thinking about Fundamentalism.)

Perry Petrushko of AiG (a citizen of Canada, though he now works here at AiG–U.S.) sent a letter to the paper (one that he used to read as a Canadian resident) in an attempt to correct the columnist’s many mistakes. The National Post chose not to use the letter or print any sort of retraction about the column’s errors, so we have posted Perry’s letter here.

Dear editor,

As a Canadian temporarily living in America and working at the Creation Museum that was attacked in the paper last Saturday, I was sad to discover that the columnist relied on second-hand, erroneous information in his commentary. We cordially invite him to the Creation Museum (near Cincinnati) to help avoid any further misunderstandings about our beliefs. He would, for example, discover that the majority of those who believe in Intelligent Design (ID) also reject evolution (contrary to the columnist’s horribly wrong assertion that IDers believe that God used evolution).1

There was also the mistaken comment that the dinosaurs would have been “crammed” onto the Ark. From information the Bible gives us, we know the Ark was the size of a modern-day aircraft carrier and quite capable of holding the required animals (perhaps 20,000) with plenty of room to spare.

Then there was the unfair attempt to paint us with a fundamentalist label and, by implication, suggest that we are in it “for the money.” In fact, the Creation Museum, a non-profit organization, is not associated with any religious organization and simply adheres to biblical authority. Further, we don’t use the King James Bible exclusively, and we reject the claims of people who say they know the day when Christ will return to earth.

The article’s final comment was about a painting in our museum that supposedly lacks Christian charity because (according to a second-hand source) it depicts Canadian journalist and former Christian Charles Templeton as a grave-digging atheist. If the columnist had visited the museum before writing so knowingly about it, he would have realized that the drawn character is a generic figure and is not Templeton, who is actually in a panel to the left.

Here at the Creation Museum, we simply present scientific evidence from a biblical perspective and leave it up to our visitors to decide whether the claims are worth further investigation (rather “Canadian” of us, don’t you think?).

I would very much like to see a follow-up article after the columnist actually visits us. We are located within a day’s drive of most of Southern Ontario.

Kind regards,

Perry Petrushko
AiG/The Creation Museum
Petersburg, KY

Meanwhile, another major national paper also commented recently on the evolution/creation controversy. Here in the U.S., the new film Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed was panned by America’s “newspaper of record,” The New York Times. A Times’ reviewer expressed doubt that professional people would be expelled if they doubted evolution; that writer also called the film a “conspiracy-theory rant masquerading as investigative inquiry.”

Here is the letter that The Times chose not to run (just as it did not do when we submitted a letter a few months ago after a Times’ guest writer outlandishly claimed that AiG believes a person had to believe in a literal Genesis to be a Christian!).

Editor:

The Times’ movie review of Expelled (April 18) blithely dismissed the possibility that scholars could be persecuted if they doubted evolution. If the several examples presented in the film were not convincing enough of the ruthlessness of some evolutionists, let me offer three additional documented examples of persecution.

A researcher at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute told his supervisor that he did not accept evolution and was expelled; Dr. Nathaniel Abraham’s belief about origins—not his competence—was the reason. In Australia, Dr. Andrew Snelling was the target of professors who attempted to strip him of his geology PhD. Lastly, our attempt to build a Creation Museum—on private property using private funds—was met by vehement opposition from evolutionists.

The movie reviewer—for whatever her worldview bias—needs to be informed that attacks on academic freedom are indeed on the rise.

Sincerely,

Mark Looy
CCO
Answers in Genesis
Petersburg, KY


Help keep these daily articles coming. Support AiG.

Footnotes

  1. At least, most of the leaders of the ID movement reject “molecules-to-man” evolution. Back