1. Jackson’s chameleon (Triceros jacksonii) has three horns that remind some people of a triceratops dinosaur. Males will sometimes “battle” each other by locking horns and attempting to push each other off the branch. Females of the subspecies in this photograph do not have horns. 1. Jackson’s chameleon (Triceros jacksonii) has three horns that remind some people of a triceratops dinosaur. Males will sometimes “battle” each other by locking horns and attempting to push each other off the branch. Females of the subspecies in this photograph do not have horns.
2. Panther chameleons are often named after the city of Madagascar where they are found, and their specific location can sometimes be recognized by their coloration. (Ambanja panther chameleon seen here.) 2. Panther chameleons are often named after the city of Madagascar where they are found, and their specific location can sometimes be recognized by their coloration. (Ambanja panther chameleon seen here.)
3. Panther chameleons are often named after the city of Madagascar where they are found, and their specific location can sometimes be recognized by their coloration. (Sambava panther chameleon seen here.) 3. Panther chameleons are often named after the city of Madagascar where they are found, and their specific location can sometimes be recognized by their coloration. (Sambava panther chameleon seen here.)
4. The pygmy leaf chameleon (Brookesia minima) 4. The pygmy leaf chameleon (Brookesia minima)
5. Veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) from the Middle East have a helmet-like growth on top of their heads called a casque. Besides sex recognition, another possible purpose of the casque is to serve in collecting water by diverting it to the chameleon’s mouth. 5. Veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) from the Middle East have a helmet-like growth on top of their heads called a casque. Besides sex recognition, another possible purpose of the casque is to serve in collecting water by diverting it to the chameleon’s mouth.
6. Reaching twenty-seven inches in length, Oustalet’s chameleon (Furcifer oustaleti) is regarded as the longest chameleon. 6. Reaching twenty-seven inches in length, Oustalet’s chameleon (Furcifer oustaleti) is regarded as the longest chameleon.
7. Montane Pygmy chameleon (Rhampholeon acuminatus). 7. Montane Pygmy chameleon (Rhampholeon acuminatus).
8. Found in the Namib desert where temperatures regularly exceed 104°F (40°C), the Namaqua chameleon (Chamaeleo namaquensis) has the highest heat tolerance of all chameleons. 8. Found in the Namib desert where temperatures regularly exceed 104°F (40°C), the Namaqua chameleon (Chamaeleo namaquensis) has the highest heat tolerance of all chameleons.
9. Jeweled chameleon (Furcifer campani). 9. Jeweled chameleon (Furcifer campani).
10. Horned leaf chameleon (Brookesia superciliaris). 10. Horned leaf chameleon (Brookesia superciliaris).
11. The Common chameleon (Chamaeleo chamaelean) is the only chameleon found in Europe. This chameleon is also found in Israel and is mentioned in the Bible (Leviticus 11:30). 11. The Common chameleon (Chamaeleo chamaelean) is the only chameleon found in Europe. This chameleon is also found in Israel and is mentioned in the Bible (Leviticus 11:30).
12. This Flap-necked chameleon (Chamaeleo dilepis) is in full display mode with occipital lobes raised to make it appear larger and more threatening. 12. This Flap-necked chameleon (Chamaeleo dilepis) is in full display mode with occipital lobes raised to make it appear larger and more threatening.
13. Canopy chameleon (Furcifer willsii). 13. Canopy chameleon (Furcifer willsii).
14. Bearded pygmy chameleons (Rieppeleon brevicaudatus) grow to be only 3 inches (7 cm) in length. 14. Bearded pygmy chameleons (Rieppeleon brevicaudatus) grow to be only 3 inches (7 cm) in length.
15. The Bearded pygmy chameleon (Rieppeleon brevicaudatus) gets its name from the single beard-like scale under its chin. 15. The Bearded pygmy chameleon (Rieppeleon brevicaudatus) gets its name from the single beard-like scale under its chin.
16. Big-nosed chameleon (Calumma nasatum). 16. Big-nosed chameleon (Calumma nasatum).
17. Sometimes exceeding two feet in length, Meller’s chameleon (Triceros melleri) is the largest chameleon on mainland Africa. 17. Sometimes exceeding two feet in length, Meller’s chameleon (Triceros melleri) is the largest chameleon on mainland Africa.
18. The Short-horned chameleon (Calumma brevicorne) is also known as the elephant-eared chameleon because of the large occipital flaps. These flaps can be raised and lowered independently or in tandem to communicate with other chameleons or to make it look larger in a defensive posture. 18. The Short-horned chameleon (Calumma brevicorne) is also known as the elephant-eared chameleon because of the large occipital flaps. These flaps can be raised and lowered independently or in tandem to communicate with other chameleons or to make it look larger in a defensive posture.
19. Parson’s chameleon (Calumma parsonii) is considered the heaviest species of chameleon. This species can weigh over 2 pounds (900 grams) and exceeds 2 feet in length. 19. Parson’s chameleon (Calumma parsonii) is considered the heaviest species of chameleon. This species can weigh over 2 pounds (900 grams) and exceeds 2 feet in length.

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