The appendix has gotten a bad rap over the years. It’s often tossed out as a useless evolutionary leftover. But recent analysis of 361 types of mammals—about 50 of which have an appendix—is overturning this myth. News reports call it “the strongest evidence yet that the appendix serves a purpose.”*

As the researchers explain, an organ that (supposedly) evolved so often must have been useful!

Experimental research over the past decade has already shed much light on the value of the appendix. One apparent function is to provide a “safe house” where beneficial bacteria can hide when dangerous germs temporarily take over the gut. Such findings result from real experimental science, which points to God’s good and purposeful design.

The latest research, however, has stepped outside the laboratory when it examines the distribution of the appendix on the evolutionary tree. Amusingly, the distribution fails to follow any particular pattern. So the researchers are forced to conclude that the appendix evolved independently 32 to 38 times!

Their conclusion, which is based on the presumption that mammals share common ancestry, defies common sense. Yet evolutionists have no choice, since they refuse to consider the Bible’s alternative account of origins and so must connect the dots in a purely naturalistic way.

While the haphazard appearance of the appendix on the evolutionary tree does not contribute anything to the advance of medical science, it does provide further confirmation that the tree is invalid!

*http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/02/appendix-evolved-more-than-30-ti.html

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