Design

Orange Clownfish

The relationship that the clownfish has with a sea anemone is truly a wonderful design feature. Very early in life, the clownfish must find a host with which to live. The sea anemone with its stinging tentacles is the perfect place for the easily preyed upon clownfish. However, the clownfish must develop a mucous that covers its body to protect it from the stings of the sea anemone. This mucous develops quickly after the clownfish brushes against the sea anemone. Once the mucous is completely formed, the clownfish is no longer prone to the effects of the sea anemone’s tentacles. The sea anemone gives protection to the clownfish, and the clownfish helps feed, oxygenate, and remove waste materials from the sea anemone. This relationship shows God’s creative hand in His creation.

Features

  • This species is easily identified by its bright orange body and three white, vertical bars.
  • Each fin is outlined with black.

Fun Facts

  • The orange clownfish is also called the clown anemonefish, percula clownfish, true clownfish, and blackfinned clownfish.
  • This fish eats the sea anemone’s leftovers.
  • Usually a female clownfish lives with other males in a group. When the female dies the head male changes sex and becomes the female.

CLASS: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)
ORDER: Perciformes (perch-like fishes)
FAMILY: Pomacentridae (damselfishes)
GENUS/SPECIES: Amphiprion percula


Size: 2–5 in (5–13 cm)
Diet: Algae, plankton, fish leftovers
Habitat: Tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific region from Northern Queensland, Australia to Melanesia, including New Britain, New Guinea, New Ireland, the Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu