An amazingly well-preserved fossilized cricket has been found by a team of scientists from the United States and China. This fossil is especially interesting because it gives scientists an intricate look at how these crickets produced sound. The crickets chirped in a way that is very similar to crickets today, although these crickets were large with wings that were seven centimeters long!1

Scientists have named the cricket Archaboilus musicus for its music-making abilities. They are studying the fossilized cricket’s wings to see what kind of music it produced. “Just like modern bush crickets—also known as katydids—the Jurassic insects produced music with their wings. A ‘plectrum’ on one wing was dragged along a microscopic comb-like structure on the other.”2

Based on their study, scientists theorize that these crickets produced low-pitched tones when they chirped. Regardless of the types of sound that they produced, God certainly equipped these crickets with the music-making ability they needed to survive! Insects, such as the cricket, were created by God on Day Six of the Creation Week around 6,000 years ago.

To learn more about the amazing design features God has created in the world around us, please see the following:

1 Dr. Elizabeth Mitchell, News to Note, February 11, 2012, Answers in Genesis, http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles/2012/02/11/news-to-note-02112012.
2 Victoria Gill, “Jurassic Cricket’s Song Recreated,” February 6, 2012, BBC Nature, http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/16878292.