Design

Hummingbird

God designed the bill of the hummingbird to be a long, slender tube. This allows the bird to go deep into flowers to extract the nectar. It also has a long tongue that is curled on its edges, forming two trays to collect the nectar. When the bird has collected the nectar, it will retract its tongue and squeeze the nectar into its throat. North American hummingbirds migrate long distances, some crossing the Gulf of Mexico.

Features

  • Hummingbirds are known for their long bills, dazzling colors, and speedy wings.
  • Hummingbirds are the smallest birds in the world, and the smallest hummingbird is the bee hummingbird, which occurs in Cuba and the Isle of Pines. It weighs approximately 0.06 ounces (1.6 g), less than a U.S. penny.

Fun Facts

  • One species of hummingbird can fly up to 93 mph (150 km/h) during short chase flights, but they can beat their wings even faster, up to 200 times per second.
  • A hummingbird takes in an incredible amount of calories daily. If humans ate the same amount as a hummingbird, we would have to ingest almost 155,000 calories a day. That’s 77 times more than most humans eat.
  • Hummingbirds are like helicopters; they can go up, down, forward, backward, and side to side with great precision.

Created Kind Members

Purple-crowned fairy, red-tailed comet, green-throated mango

CLASS: Aves (birds)
ORDER: Apodiformes (unfooted birds)
FAMILY: Trochilidae (hummingbirds)
GENUS/SPECIES: 328 species


Size: Largest: 8.6 in (0.2 m); Smallest: 2 in (0.05 m)
Weight: 0.06–0.7 oz. (1.6–21 grams)
Original Diet: Plants
Present Diet: Nectar and occasionally insects
Habitat: An extremely wide range of habitats in North, Central, and South America